November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness month. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks.

It’s estimated that there are approximately 44 million people worldwide living with Alzheimer’s disease or a related form of dementia. In the U.S., an estimated 5.5 million people have this disease.

Do you know someone who is or might be affected by Alzheimer’s? Learn the 10 warning signs to watch for from the Alzheimer’s Association below:

  1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life
  2. Challenges in planning or solving problems
  3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure
  4. Confusion with time or place
  5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships
  6. New problems with words in speaking or writing
  7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps
  8. Decreased or poor judgement
  9. Withdrawal from work or social activities
  10. Changes in mood and personality

Are you wondering, what now? What if I do notice these signs and symptoms in one of my loved ones? The next step you should take is to see the doctor.

Early detection can be very important with Alzheimer’s disease. If detected early, you have the opportunity to explore different treatments that can help extend your independent lifestyle longer.

It’s important to take notice of your loved ones and their health. If you’re starting to worry about a loved one’s memory and their living situation, let us help. We have an Assisted Living Decisions Guide that outlines the senior communities and services we offer throughout the Midwest.

Our Assisted Living Decisions Guide is designed to help you make good decisions for your future or that of a loved one. There are many factors to consider — financial security, ongoing healthcare, and overall safety and well-being.

It’s important to educate yourself and your loved ones of Alzheimer’s disease so that if the time comes, you are prepared. If you have any further questions or would like to learn more about our assisted living communities, please contact us at 952-941-3175.

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Did you know? October is National Physical Therapy month. As we age it’s important to remember to prioritize our health. One way to do that is by taking care of ourselves when we are in pain.

Are you wondering how you can accomplish that in order to maintain your health? There’s one answer: physical therapy.

According to Web MD, physical therapy is a non-drug, no-surgery treatment that works for arthritis, cancer pain, Parkinson’s and incontinence and improves your strength and endurance.

General aging can cause many seniors to be in a lot of pain whether they have arthritis, recently fell, have been in an accident, sick, or simply just tired. To help you understand what physical therapy can do for you or a loved one, we’ll walk through four physical therapy types according to seniorliving.org:

  1. Manual Therapy
    Manual therapy is done by the therapist with their hands. The goal is to reduce any pain and relax the patient. This process includes massaging muscles to improve circulation and reduce pain. It also includes slow movements to stretch arms or legs—twisting and pulling joints or bones and making sure they are put into place.
  2. Electrical Stimulation
    This type of physical therapy is when electrical currents are going through the body in hopes to contract the muscles that may not be working as they should. Electrical stimulation is used when someone is experiencing pain, spasms or muscular weakness.
  3. Heat Therapy
    Heat is used when the need is to relax muscles and increase blood circulation. Heat therapy is a great way to loosen stiff joints caused my immobility. Another use of this therapy is to loosen the muscles before further physical activity takes place.
  4. Cold Therapy
    Cold therapy is a great type of physical therapy for those with arthritis. Cold temperatures are used to reduce pain and inflammation. This type of therapy often follows the process, also known as RICE – rest, ice, compression and elevation.

According to the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), physical therapy can restore or increase strength, range of motion, flexibility, coordination, and endurance – as well as reduce pain. Another role is to help the patient to do everyday tasks. If you or a loved one feels they are in pain, physical therapy may be the solution.

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Each year in October, we raise awareness and highlight the importance of education and research of the most common cancer in American women besides skin cancer: breast cancer.

According to the American Cancer Society’s estimates for breast cancer in the U.S. for 2018, about 266,120 cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed in women.

However, if breast cancer is detected early, there are more treatment options and a better chance of survival. Women whose breast cancer is detected at an early stage have a 93 percent or higher survival rate in the first five years, according to the Carol Milgard Breast Center.

As reported by the American Cancer Society, at this time, there are more than 3.1 million breast cancer survivors in the U.S.!

Fortunately, there is one major factor in detecting breast cancer early and that is getting mammograms regularly.

It’s recommended that if you are 50 to 74 years old, you should be getting a mammogram every two years by the United States Preventative Services Task Force. If you are 40 to 49 years old, you should talk to your doctor about when to start getting mammograms.

Many organizations and people are dedicated to raising awareness to this cancer during the month of October and throughout the year. There are many ways you can get involved to help too.

3 Ways to Get involved:

1. Educate yourself and others
Get this free Breast Health Guide to educate yourself and your loved ones about breast cancer. There may be more than you thought to learn.

2. Raise awareness
Spread the word about the importance of detecting breast cancer early through mammograms to your friends and family.

3. Donate
Donating your time or money is a great way to get involved in Breast Cancer Awareness Month. There are many organizations you can donate to like, Breast Cancer Research Foundation or the National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc. If you want to donate your time, try starting your own fundraiser with your business or school.

This October, how will you get involved during Breast Cancer Awareness Month?

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Does your family enjoy reminiscing about the past? Take advantage of these precious moments to learn more about your loved ones.

Talking through your family history can be therapeutic. During these reminiscing times, don’t be afraid to ask questions or bring out photo albums or mementos to spark a moment in time that allows for a fun and sometimes touching exercise.

There are many ways to start off these insightful conversations.

One helpful tool is the internet—it will offer quite a few sample questions to help you get started.

The day’s news or events can also be a great place to begin. For example, if you purchased gasoline on your way to visit, you may mention the cost per gallon and ask how much it was when your parent/grandparent was learning to drive. This can take you on a journey of follow up questions like, who taught you to drive? Where did you learn? What kind of car was it? What did you have to do to get your license?

What seems like a mundane life experience can actually help generate a whole new perspective about what your loved ones were like when they were younger. You may even see similarities in personality, mannerisms and talents in yourself or another relative.

Another way to spark conversation is to watch a documentary about an important event or person in history. This can bring people back to that moment and share details they may have forgotten themselves. Mining these memories with positive encouragement makes everyone feel important.

So, be creative, think about the time of year we’re in now—back to school—or what you ate for lunch that day or things your children have said, take these experiences and turn them into questions. Then, sit back and listen or record stories that you will cherish forever.

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Just because you are retired, doesn’t mean that your passion for learning new things is too.

There are many ways to satisfy your intellectual curiosity. Whether that’s going back to school or simply for the joy of learning like, exploring throughout your city, you can find many ways to continue to learn throughout your life.

Did you start a degree but then put it aside for your family or to serve in the military? If so, why not go back and finish what you started? So many people have gone on to finish degrees or start another field of study so, you can too! It might even inspire your family and show them you have a never-quit mentality.

GOING BACK TO SCHOOL

When thinking about getting a degree, remember there will be certain requirements to get into school. But generally, all you need to do is apply and enroll in post-secondary classes. As a senior you won’t need to worry about SAT scores or entrance essays. Here are a few of the general requirements:

  • Age requirements: this is often 60 years or older.
  • Residency requirements: you must be a citizen of the United States.
  • Income restrictions: you may need to meet income restrictions in order to access scholarships, tuition waivers or other senior discounts.
  • Proof of retirement
  • Completion of high school diploma
FOR THE JOY OF LEARNING

Learning for fun can be just as rewarding as working toward a degree. It’s a sad day when we don’t learn something new so, why not take advantage of what your community has to offer. Here are a few ways you can learn new things every day:

  • Be a tourist: explore your own city on your own or sign up for a walking, bus or museum tour to learn about the local history.
  • Exchange stories: when you explore you tend to meet new people. Share your stories with some of the people you meet and they’ll share some too!
  • Take a cooking class: sign up for a class to cook something you’ve never cooked from scratch before.
  • Take a writing class: capture your family’s history in this class and gift it during the holiday season!
  • Volunteer: sign up to be a tutor at your local elementary or high schools.
RESOURCES

A Senior Citizen Guide for College
www.aseniorcitizenguideforcollege.com

MONEY Magazine
Forget Tuition: How Retirees Can Attend College for Free

The Penny Hoarder
Free College Courses for Senior Citizens

The Bernard Osher Foundation
www.osherfoundation.org
(415) 861-5587

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Nutrition and sleep and exercise all factor into a healthy lifestyle, but did you know relationships are equally important when it comes to aging well?

It makes sense, from a purely mental perspective, that you’re probably more happy when you’re  pending time with friends or family than you are sitting home alone, watching TV. What’s interesting, though, is that feelings of loneliness don’t only affect your state of mind, but also your physical health. Studies have found that chronic loneliness—over time—can be associated with high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, a diminished immune response, depression, difficulty sleeping, cognitive decline, and dementia. No matter our age, we never outgrow our need for friends. (Our health depends on it.)

 

BENEFITS OF SOCIAL OPPORTUNITIES  

 

Promote physical activity

When people feel isolated, they tend to have fewer reasons to get out and be active.

Provide a sense of purpose  

When seniors feel that they’re making positive contributions in society, they have a greater sense of purpose in life. According to Bryan James, a Chicago-area epidemiologist, seniors with a sense of purpose are less likely to become depressed or become diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

Introduce more fun into your life

Participating in activities is just more fun when you have someone to share the experience with. (Plus friends are more likely to inspire you to try something new.)

Improve your mental health

We aren’t meant to be disengaged with others. Studies show that seniors who have strong social connections are 70 percent less likely to experience cognitive decline than those who are isolated. (“Use it or lose it” applies to both the body AND the mind.)

Encourage health checkups

When a friend encourages an adult to get a health screening, they’re up to 22 percent more likely to actually follow through on it. This results in serious health issues detected earlier, and treated with higher rates of success.

Give you a sense of belonging

Loneliness is not the same as being alone. At American Baptist Homes of the Midwest communities, if you want to relax in your room, that’s fine. If you want to chat over a cup of coffee or join an activity, neighbors are right next door. You can be alone when you choose, but you won’t ever be lonely. Living here is all about convenience, safety, a genuine sense of community, and making authentic, meaningful connections. Our communities were designed to maximize friendship, health, and happiness. If you’d like to set up a tour, call us at 952-941-3175.

 

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